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STUDIO:
  Warner Home Video
MSRP: $19.98
RATED:  Not Rated
RUNNING TIME: 83 Minutes
SPECIAL FEATURES:
- Interviews

 





The Pitch

Annie Leibovitz takes snapshots.


It’s like the chubby guy from Little Britain is morphing into an old bloated whore.



The Humans

Annie Leibovitz, Bette Midler, Keith Richards, Meryl Streep and many more!

The Nutshell

Annie Leibovitz is the premiere photographer of our time. Her portraits have graced the covers of endless amounts of magazines. Now, we’re treated to a short documentary that interviews the subjects of her portraits. Why has Leibovitz been able to be so tightly knit to the zeitgeist? What makes her so special? Today, we’ll find out.

The Lowdown

Life Through a Lens is a look at Annie’s work via her sister. The documentary starts by mixing the personal and the professional. We see Annie grow up through old footage into the master that she is today. But, there’s never too much Annie in front of the camera. It’s always the ghost behind the scenes.


This man hasn’t been relevant in 30+ years.


There isn’t that much asskissery in this documentary. Keith Richards, Bette Midler and others are given the chance to give sanctimonious bullshit speeches, but it never happens. Not a lot of attention is paid to Leibovitz’s drug problem while at Rolling Stone. No one says a word about Susan Sontag. Hell, no one talks about Leibovitz being a lesbian.


It’s as sticky as Amy Winehouse’s cunt, but more talented.


The best thing about the film is it’s about the work. No one tries to derail the subject matter and everyone is deadly serious about the photos. Annie’s got an amazing body of work and this documentary should be viewed as a starter course on their impact.


Stock pop footage.


Perhaps, the documentary could’ve benefitted from being a tad longer. But, that feels like aesthetic bullshit. What matters is that we’ve got an honest look at an honest body of work. Forget the artist, forget the history and just focus on the material. If only all documentaries could be like this film.


So old that he remembers the Call of Cthulu.


The Package

The DVD is standard issue. You get some extra interviews and that’s about it. The A/V Quality doesn’t do a whole lot, but it looks decent on my LCD screen. What were you expecting here? This isn’t going to rock your home theater.


7.7 out of 10